Back Cove Blog

Back Cove 37 Design Updates


The Back Cove Team is excited to announce several interior design updates to the Back Cove 37. Check out the image captions for all the details, and keep an eye out for more photos on the way!

Master Stateroom

– New storage lockers on shelf, port & starboard – USB charging port on the forward end of the storage lockers, port & starboard – Starboard cabinet with interior storage drawers – Mattress upgrade to 8”; 1.8 lb density foam with perforated top foam layer for better ventilation

 

Guest Stateroom

– Replace hanging locker with side table (same surface as head & galley) – Charging station moved to above the side table

Head

– Larger sink – Two overhead lights (recessed) with dimmer – 2nd towel bar

Galley

– Microwave moved to countertop level for easier access – Silverware drawer in top drawer where microwave used to be

Other Changes

  • Water/exhaust separator added to geneset to reduce water discharge noise (Standard)
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Early Season in the San Juan Islands


March 1st, 2018 seemed like a good time to check on Ellgi (pronounced LG), our BC 41 hull #4, in Bellingham, WA., of the Pacific Northwest. After a flight from our home base in California, we arrived in Bellingham; the sun was shining, winds were calm and made for a perfect day to get her prepped for the upcoming season. 

It seemed like a long time since we had last seen her in November of 2017 when we left her winterized and in the snow at the Bellingham docks.

November 2017

After 3 hours of checking her systems, DE-winterizing, and making her shine, we left the docks and headed to Anacortes, WA, for provisions to last us through a 6-day cruise of the San Juan Islands. The flat water could not have been better, the only ripples were from playful seals and boats checking their crab pots.

Checked the Marine Traffic app to see who else might be cruising in the area and found only a handful of boats out and about. I think everyone else was surprised the weather could be so great in early March. We spent several nights at Roche Harbor, which is one of the best harbors in the San Juan islands.

Sunsets at Roche Harbor are a sight to behold. They have a flag ceremony every evening from May to October as the sun sets.

The cruise around the island of San Juan is worth the time – Mosquito Pass, Lime Kiln Light House, Cattle Point, Seal Rock, Bald Eagles, and on to Friday Harbor make for a special day cruise.

Next day we spent on Patos Island which is a small island just south of the Canadian border. There’s a great place to tie to a mooring ball called Active Cove, which has just enough room for two boats. This time of year we were the only ones on the island. A dingy ride to shore, a short walk to the Light House and then a nice driftwood bon fire made for an enjoyable island adventure.

After six days in early March with mostly sunny skies and calm seas, it was time to head back to Bellingham. We cruised through Bellingham Bay with water like glass, then it was time to give Ellgi a bath, secure her to the dock, and say goodbye until we see her again in mid-April. We did have the reverse cycle heaters on for a warm  Galley, Salon, and Staterooms.

We hope to see you sometime in the Pacific Northwest cruising the San Juan’s, Canada and Alaska!

Lynn and Lori

BC 41 – Ellgi (named after our initials LG)

 

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34O Production Update


Production is underway on the first Back Cove 34O…

… and this is one build you don’t want to miss! Catch up on the latest news here, and join the 34O email list for exclusive info and updates

Hull 001 Construction

34O Transom Details

Bustles to port and starboard integrate the shapes of the outboards – preserving the Downeast aesthetic by blending her lines with the shape of the outboards

The swim platform remains spacious, and will become more so once swim steps are added around the “engine well.”

A centerline hatch will cover all rigging for the outboard motors, providing a clear and secure walking surface as well as convenient access.

34O Storage Details

The 34O will feature incredible storage, accessed by a large hatch in the helm deck sole.

The jaw-dropping all-purpose area amounts to 38 square feet of clear space. (If that doesn’t sound like much, believe us, it is).

Hull 001 will feature an optional workbench to starboard, leaving ample remaining space for bikes, stand-up paddleboards, and more!

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34O Hull Design


The first Back Cove with outboard engines features an entirely new hull design.

Kevin Burns, VP of Product Design & Development, explains the new features, and the power of computational fluid dynamics in the design process.

More Info: Introducing the Back Cove 34O

Back Cove 34O Layout

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Mooring and Docking


Among the best perks of my position as Engineering Manager at Back Cove is performing sea trials to validate a new model or engineering change. Launching a boat that is fresh off the production floor is always exciting, though there have been moments of nervousness as I departed the dock knowing one of our infamous New England Nor’easters was brewing. But then again, what better time for a sea trial?

Nevertheless, after a rough-weather trial, it is always a relief once the boat returns to harbor and is securely tied. I take comfort that any Back Cove or Sabre will be safe and sound at the dock during a storm, primarily because of how the strong points are designed.

Technical Details

All of our models meet ABYC guidelines so, if we use the Back Cove 41 as an example, all mooring cleats and the structure to which they are attached must withstand a working load of almost 10,000 pounds. Maybe this seems like a lot to ask from a single metal part, but a fully-loaded Back Cove 41 weighs about 30,000 lbs, and the 5/16” diameter mounting posts on our stainless steel cleats can withstand a 35,000-pound pull-force before failure.

Since it is unlikely the cleat itself will fail, detailed attention is given to the strong points to which the cleat is mounted.

Cleat Mounting

All Back Coves and Sabres have cleats mounted into solid fiberglass. The mounting studs pass through ½” of solid fiberglass and a ½” backing plate. We finish the connection with stainless washers and nylon lock nuts. When force is applied to the cleat, it is distributed from the threads to the nut, then to the washer, the backing plate, and finally to the fiberglass deck. It would be a terrifying force that could rip these cleats off the deck, and I hope never to witness a storm generating those conditions.

Dock Lines

Dock lines and fenders are the final elements necessary to make any boat genuinely secure at the dock, no matter the conditions. For many boaters; a proper spring line can be masterfully used to maneuver a vessel under challenging conditions. Because all Back Cove yachts have a bow thruster, and many have the optional stern thruster, using spring lines to move into or off of the dock is typically not necessary. However, midship forward and aft spring lines to secure a vessel for long-term docking are advantageous.Dock Line Diagram

Once spring lines are in place, a boat can easily be moved forward/aft to make the best use of dock space. Finally, adding bow and stern lines keeps the vessel tight to the dock. I prefer to use the outside transom cleat to maximize access to the swim platform and transom door as illustrated in the drawing above.

Cleats can accept two spliced loops of 5/8" braided dock lineWe have significant tidal changes in Maine, so short spring lines perpendicular to the dock are usually avoided, as they do not allow an adequate vertical range of movement. The 10” deck cleats mounted to the toe-rail on all Back Coves are good for 5/8” braided dock lines and can accept two spliced loops each.  

When tying up to a mooring, I recommend a 5/8” rope bridle to split the loads between the starboard and port forward cleats. The length of the bridle and painter should be 2.5x the height of the strong point above the waterline.

Fenders

Last but not least, I recommend three fenders on the docked side of the vessel, as illustrated below. The first located aft on the pop-up cleat (on 2016 and newer Back Coves), one amidships at the beamiest part of the hull and one somewhere in between on the rail or stanchion. I like to make my fender whips out of ½” dock line, so they are long enough to tie up to the highest part of the bow rail. Using the bow rails to tie off the fenders also keeps the cleats free for dock lines. Felt fender covers, of course, add to the presentation of the boat and cover up smudges on the unprotected rubber fender.fender diagram

Now that we know everything is secure boat-side, how reliable do the dock-side cleats look at your favorite tie-up spot?

– Keith Warren, Engineering Manager, Back Cove Yachts

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